May 17, 2022

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Mets sever ties with Robinson Canoe

The New York Mets on Monday said they had severed ties with senior second baseman Robinson Cono, who is set to recover about $ 40 million from a 10-year, $ 240 million contract he signed with Seattle Mariners before the 2014 season.

Canoe, 39, batted first in 12 games with a home run and three RBIs.195 (8-for-41) after returning to the major leagues after a second suspension for violating a baseball anti-doping policy.

After the appointment, Kano will have to wait a week to become a free agent and sign with any other group that will only pay him the minimum wage rate ($ 700,000 in 2022), while he will be responsible for most of New York. His $ 24 million guaranteed salary for this and next season.

When they traded the canoe to the Mets in December 2018, the Marines agreed to pay $ 3.75 million a year in the canoe’s salary.

Canoe is batting.302 with 2,632 wins in 17 years in the major leagues, including 335 home runs and 1,305 Reserve Banks, but as May 2 approaches, the player’s future in the Queens has been a talking point in recent days. The Mets and all other major league clubs should reduce their pay from 28 to 26.

Major league rosters usually have 26 players, but due to a lack of spring training, the commissioner’s office allowed the addition of two extra pieces, mostly relief jars, between April 7 and May 1.

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“This is a situation no one wants to be in,” Kano said Sunday night. “One is never ready for things, but when they come, one changes. What God wants must happen in life,” he added.

The eight-time All-Star and multiple Gold Glove winner, Cono seemed to go to the Cooperstown Hall of Fame until he was suspended twice for doping. The first ban occurred in May 2018 for 80 games, and the second, for 162 games in 2021, was announced in November 2020.

The player complained to the Mets training camp in Port St. Lucy, Fla., Without any guarantee of new manager Buck Schwolder’s overall plan.

“I’m not thinking about a role, but I’m feeling good about competing,” Kano said after apologizing to his teammates and Mets fans.

“It depends on how he feels and grows physically. I can not tell you now how many games he’s going to play in the second phase, how many DH shifts or anything else he’s going to do. Ready for the season,” Showalder said. “Jeff McNeill is very fond of playing second bass,” the manager at the time added.