September 23, 2021

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‘I don’t want to live anymore. My children need to build their lives, ‘said former Bolivian President Jenin ez International | News

The release contains a text indicating that the former president is “very weak”.

EFE

Bolivia’s interim president Jenin Cheese said on Tuesday that she “did not want to live anymore”, suffered an injury to her hands two days later and that one day the prison administration had imprisoned her for new medical tests.

“I don’t want to live anymore. My kids have to live a life. I don’t want any drugs that I don’t know what they are. I ask my jailers to tell me what I’m taking,” Cess’s news posted on their social networks said.

The release contains a text stating that the former president is “very weak” and that he suffers “permanently” every 10 minutes because someone “doesn’t know” inside her cell. .

“She lives with caution, pain, and rest because she does not know what they are going to do to her. If she is seduced, poison her or take her in an unknown direction,” the message reads.

This week Carolina Ribeira, Zeiss’s daughter, asked to have access to her mother’s medical history because she did not know the treatment she was undergoing, although the prison administration said no one had denied the document.

On Saturday, the government ministry said that Ease had tried to create “self-harm” which he described as “scratches” and that the former interim president was stable.

For its part, the former president’s security Áñez noted that the wounds were made with a clip and that her wounds needed sutures.

In the aftermath of the incident, former presidents, local officials and international organizations such as the European Union and the US Embassy expressed their concern about Áñez’s health.

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In addition, many asked if she was suffering from high blood pressure and anxiety-depression syndrome and should be allowed to defend herself independently in her situation.

Chess, who has been incarcerated at a women’s prison in La Paz since March, was taken to a private medical center for a neurological tomography.

“It will determine if there are injuries to the muscles or nerves,” Manica Molina, the doctor in charge of the study, told the media.

The former president had difficulty climbing the steps of the place and was in the midst of heavy police security with the help of his two children.

After this test, he was taken back to jail in an ambulance.

He was released from prison three times this month for various medical evaluations.

Her family assures her that she is vulnerable, while the government maintains that she is “stable” and capable of serving her preventive care.

Protests took place in the prison

A dozen inmates at the prison where Zez is being held protested on Tuesday demanding equal treatment and condemned the former president’s “concessions”, which were backed by authorities to deny their rights were being violated.

Government (Interior) Minister Eduardo del Castillo promised that the rights of the former president would be “protected” but insisted that she had “privileges” compared to other women who had lost their freedom.

That is why he declared that a “legal initiative” to change prisons was being worked out.

“We are not going to allow some people to have privileges, we do not guarantee others to exercise all their rights,” Del Castillo said.

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Meanwhile, Ribeira posted some photos to show her mother’s cell on her social networks.

“A bed, a table, two chairs, a small radio and a sink. They were my mother’s ‘luxuries,’ wrote the young woman.

The so-called “coup” case has been in custody since March on charges of conspiracy, treason and terrorism during the 2019 political and social crisis.

C செsin’s two former ministers and several former police and military leaders are in custody due to a “coup” case being investigated at the request of the government’s Socialist Movement (MAS). (I)